14.8 BILLION MEALS A YEAR USING 0.00008% OF THE WORLD’S OCEANS – IRELAND CAN BUILD ON SALMON FARMING’S GLOBAL SUCCESS

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14.8 BILLION MEALS A YEAR USING 0.00008% OF THE WORLD’S OCEANS – IRELAND CAN BUILD ON SALMON FARMING’S GLOBAL SUCCESS
18 Mar 2015

14.8 BILLION MEALS A YEAR USING 0.00008% OF THE WORLD’S OCEANS – IRELAND CAN BUILD ON SALMON FARMING’S GLOBAL SUCCESS

Aquaculture

A new report published at the largest seafood show in the Americas describes in detail the positive socio-economic impact of salmon farming worldwide. 

The International Salmon Farmers’ Association has published the first report of scientifically supported facts showing the sector’s global employment, environment and food contribution. Specific case studies include Clare Island sea-farm – the world’s longest-established organically certified salmon farm.

Irish Salmon Growers’ Association Executive, Richie Flynn, said at the launch, “When you examine the facts, the conclusion that salmon farming is efficient, sustainable and vitally important for communities is indisputable. Ireland reflects the global success with our market-focused farming while operating in coastal areas that would otherwise have been left to wither and die.”

He continued, “Despite our small production, Ireland has been a leader since the early days of sea farming and our members are responsible for many innovations such as off-shore and organic farming techniques. We can be proud of our contribution to this remarkable industry but more importantly we can bring more of that success home with a focused effort by government.”

The industry in Ireland is waiting for clear governmental support in the form of licencing. Recent announcements by Marine Harvest Ireland of plans to invest €22 million to secure jobs and the award of the first ever WWF-Aquaculture Stewardship Council certification shows, the industry is committed to a long term future in Ireland.
Mr Flynn said, “We need the tools to produce enough product for the marketplace instead of turning away customers who want Irish fish. We need to have a consistent supply all year round and the kind of modern licencing arrangements which encourage efficiency. We need a better educated bureaucracy and a stronger link between policy aspirations and actual delivery of services. IFA has been calling for that link to be-established for the last 12 months to rebalance of the slow, unfocused inertia which has dominated official interaction in Ireland towards aquaculture. I hope that decision makers read this report carefully and consider not why we haven’t capitalised on the success of the global salmon revolution but how we do so into the future.”

Read the full report

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