BREXIT UPDATE – 24 MARCH

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BREXIT UPDATE - 24 MARCH
24 Mar 2017

BREXIT UPDATE – 24 MARCH

Brussels, Brussels Daily

   24 April 2017

IFA will hold a major Brexit event on Monday, 24th April in Goffs, Co Kildare.

EU Commissioner for Agriculture Phil Hogan, the Minister for Agriculture Michael Creed, IFA representatives and industry leaders will speak at the event.

Find out more or book your place here!


Read what IFA has to say on Brexit: The Imperatives for Irish Farmers & the Agri-Food Sector


 

24/03/17   BREXIT TIMELINE

Theresa May’s government will on March 29 inform the EU of its intention to leave the Union.

A meeting of EU Ambassadors will follow on March 31, with the EU’s draft negotiating guidelines to be ready for final consultation on April 19.

Ministers will meet for the first time on April 27 in Luxembourg, and national leaders at a scheduled EU27 Summit in Brussels on April 29.

 


IFA Brexit Conference with FBD

23/03/17   BREXIT CANNOT DERAIL FARMING & FOOD GROWTH TARGETS

Speaking at the ASA debate on Brexit in Kilkenny this afternoon, IFA President Joe Healy dismissed any suggestion of diluting growth targets for the farming and food industry because of Brexit. He said, “Food Wise 2025 sets out ambitious targets based on our capacity to expand production. It would be extremely shortsighted to jettison clear objectives at this point”. Read statement in full here


22/03/17     SPEECH BY MICHEL BARNIER, CHIEF NEGOTIATOR ON BREXIT

Speech by Michel Barnier, Chief Negotiator for the Preparation and Conduct of the Negotiations with the United Kingdom, at the plenary session of the European Committee of the Regions

The first condition is the unity of the 27, which goes hand in hand with transparency and public debate. Since I took up office on 1 October, I have met the governments of all 27 Member States. Over the past few weeks, I have started a second tour of the capitals to meet the governments again, as well as the national parliaments, trade unions and professional organisations. Read  Speech by Michel Barnier

 

 

21/03/17   EU COUNCIL PRESIDENT TUSK CALL A EUROPEAN COUNCIL ON BREXIT FOR 29 APRIL

In view of what was announced in London yesterday, I would like to inform you that I will call a European Council, in an EU27 format (without the UK), on Saturday 29th April 2017 to adopt the guidelines for the Brexit talks,” said President Tusk at the press briefing with Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe on 21 March 2017.

“As you all know, I personally wish the UK hadn’t chosen to leave the EU, but the majority of British voters decided otherwise. Therefore, we must do everything we can to make the process of divorce the least painful for the EU, ” said Tusk.

He highlighted that the main priority for the negotiations must be to create as much certainty and clarity as possible for all citizens, companies and member states that will be negatively affected by Brexit as well as for the Eu’s important partners and friends around the world.

EU and the UK after the referendum on 23 June

20/03/17   ARTICLE 50: WHAT HAPPENS NEXT ?

 

It has been announced today that Article 50 will be triggered by the UK on Wednesday 29 March.

To help understand the next steps in this process, here is a short information note to Article 50 – what is it, what happens next, and who is involved.

Read the Irish Government’s information note on Article 50 here.

 

20/03/17   THERESA MAY TO TRIGGER ARTICLE 50 ON 29 MARCH

Britain is exiting the 28-country EU bloc, which it joined in 1973. Initially envisaged as a free-trade zone that now includes 500 million consumers, the EU is, in the eyes of many Britons, too bureaucratic, too expensive and an obstacle to stopping mass immigration.

Negotiation procedure

At their informal meeting of December 2016, the 27 leaders agreed on the following procedure for upcoming Brexit talks:

  1. UK triggers Article 50 by notifying the European Council of its intention to leave.
  2. The EU 27 leaders adopt ‘guidelines’, including principles and general positions, for negotiations. They will update these guidelines in the course of the negotiations, as necessary.
  3. Following a recommendation by the Commission, the General Affairs Council authorises the opening of negotiations.
  4. The Council adopts negotiating directives on substance and on the detailed institutional arrangements. These may be amended and supplemented throughout the negotiations.
  5. The Council will appoint the Commission as the Union negotiator who will negotiate on behalf of the 27. The Commission nominated Michel Barnier as chief negotiator. It will report back to leaders and to the Council throughout the negotiation and will also keep the European Parliament “closely and regularly informed”.
  6. The Council and its preparatory bodies will ensure that negotiations are conducted in line with guidelines provided by the EU 27. It will provide guidance to the Commission.

17/03/17   THE IMPACT AND CONSEQUENCES OF BREXIT FOR NORTHERN IRELAND

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned a briefing on the impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on Northern Ireland, the part of the UK most distinctly affected by Brexit. The briefing analyses the implications of Brexit on the Northern Irish economy and on the freedom of movement from the establishment of a “hard border” between Northern Ireland and the Republic. It examines the possible consequences of Brexit on the relations between communities in Northern Ireland and well as between the UK and the Republic. It looks into the implications of Brexit on the Good Friday Agreement and examines possible bespoke deals between the UK and Irish governments on Northern Ireland following Brexit. Read Report here

 

16/03/17   BREXIT NEGOTIATIONS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE LEGAL, POLITICAL AND INSTITUTIONAL SITUATION IN THE UK

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned an in-depth analysis on the political and institutional situation in the United Kingdom following the referendum on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. The research analyses the post-Brexit political developments in the UK, the various parameters that should be taken into account, by both the UK government and the 27, in view of the Article 50 negotiations and the possible shape of …

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned an in-depth analysis on the political and institutional situation in the United Kingdom following the referendum on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. The research analyses the post-Brexit political developments in the UK, the various parameters that should be taken into account, by both the UK government and the 27, in view of the Article 50 negotiations and the possible shape of the final deal and the future economic relationship, taking into account the EU obligations and the constraints of Theresa May’s government.  Read the In-Depth Analysis here

15/03/17   BREXIT: IRELAND’S PRIORITIES

The decision of the United Kingdom to leave the European Union presents unprecedented political, economic and diplomatic challenges for Ireland. Challenges that extend right across the policy spectrum.

This information booklet, Brexit: Ireland’s Priorities, outlines the Irish Government’s main priorities and concerns ahead of the Brexit negotiations.

This booklet has been produced in advance of the triggering of Article 50 and to coincide with the ministerial travel programme for St Patrick’s Day.  More detailed negotiation priorities will follow after the triggering of Article 50 by the UK.

You can read the information guide online  or can download a printable version here.

 

Brexit Priorities

08/03/17   GOVERNMENT & EU BREXIT POSITION HAS TO PUT FARMING FIRST

Launching IFA’s policy Brexit: The Imperatives for Irish Farmers & the Agri-Food Sector in Dublin today, IFA President Joe Healy said the implications for Irish agriculture are so serious that farming has to be first in the Government’s negotiating position.

Joe Healy said the threat of Brexit is the most significant challenge facing our farming and food sector in the history of the State, with 40% of our food exports going to the UK. He said farmers expect our Government to launch a major diplomatic offensive at EU level that places our issues at the heart of the negotiations.

Simply put, no other Member State and no other sector is as exposed in these negotiations.

“UK is our closet market, of high value with similar preferences. The implications of a hard Brexit are stark: the ESRI estimates a potential reduction of EU trade to the UK of over 60% for dairy and 85% for meat. Translating this to an Irish context would mean a fall of €1.5bn in meat exports, with dairy exports falling by over €600m.”

Irish farming and the agri-food sector is particularly vulnerable to Brexit due to:

  • A high dependence on the UK market;
  • High EU tariff protection applying to major agricultural products;
  • The land border with Northern Ireland, with the potential to disrupt trade flows, and undermine animal health co-operation; and
  • The importance of the CAP budget to farm income – UK a net contributor

Joe Healy said IFA is clear that farming and food must be top of the Brexit agenda, not only in Ireland, but at EU level. “With 22 million farmers and 40 million related jobs, there is a wider strategic objective here to maximise the future value of the EU farming and food sector.”

The key priorities for the farming and the food sector are the maintenance of the closest possible trading relationship between the UK and EU, while preserving the value of the UK market; and a strong CAP budget following the UK’s departure, which is critical for farm incomes, farm output and economic activity in rural Ireland.

Specifically, IFA has identified that, if the UK exits the Single Market and Customs Union, there must be a Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement between the EU and UK, which would include the following specific elements for agriculture and food:

  •  Tariff-free trade for agricultural products and food;
  • Maintenance of equivalent standards on food safety, animal health, welfare and the environment; and
  • Application of the Common External Tariff for imports to both the EU and UK.

IFA Livestock Chairman Angus Woods said the UK is the market for 50% of Irish beef exports. “It’s a high-value market and consistently pays above the EU average. Any reduction in access to, or the value of the UK market, would have a very negative impact on the Irish beef sector, and potentially the overall European beef market.”

IFA Deputy President Richard Kennedy said one-third of dairy exports went to the UK in 2016. Our cheddar cheese volumes of 78,000 tonnes represented 82% of all cheddar imported by the UK last year. “Retention of tariff-free access is critically important, particularly for cheddar exports. The loss of this, or indeed any negative impact on access, could have a destabilising impact on the overall value of the Irish dairy sector.”

IFA’s Project Team led by the President Joe Healy will be undertaking high level contacts with the Oireachtas, Government Departments, the EU Commission and the EU Parliament in the coming months. IFA will also be engaging with the wider agri-food sector and with farming organisations across Europe.

IFA Director General Damian McDonald announced that Elaine Farrell has been appointed IFA’s Brexit co-ordinator for the campaign.

IFA will hold a major Brexit event on Mon, 24th April next. EU Commissioner for Agriculture Phil Hogan, the Minister for Agriculture Michael Creed, IFA representatives and industry leaders will speak at the event in Goffs, Co Kildare. Find out more or book your place here!

Read the full IFA Position Paper on Brexit

More information on Brexit

BREXIT CONFUSION? TAKE A LOOK AT THE IFA GLOSSARY



17/01/17 BREXIT AND THE EUROPEAN UNION

This study, requested by the Committee on Consitutional Affairs, examines the Political and Instiutional steps taken, or to be taken, both by the UK and the EU in the context of the the Brexit Referendum vote.

Full study here

 

01/01/17   BREXIT – THE UNITED KINGDOM AND EU FINANCIAL SERVICES

This briefing describes the prominent role of the UK in the single market for financial services, and highlights which activities rely today on passporting for their daily business with the other 27 Member States. The briefing relies on publicly available information, including secondary sources, such as analytical papers done by research institutes and private sector companies. The briefing may be regularly updated pending new information.

Full report here

 

BRIEFING ON ARTICLE 50: WITHDRAWAL OF A MEMBER STATE FROM THE EU

The right of a Member State to withdraw from the European Union was introduced for the first time with the Lisbon Treaty; the possibility of withdrawal was highly controversial before that.  Article 50 TEU does not set down any sustantive conditions for a Member State to be able to exercise its right to withdraw, rather it includes only procedural requirements.  It provides for the negotiation of a withdrawal agreement between the EU and the withdrawing state, defining in particular the latter’s future relationship with the Union. If no agreement is concluded within two year, that stat’es membership ends automatically, unless the European Council and the Member State concerned decide jointly to extend this period.

Full Briefing here

 

 

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