OUTCOME OF CAP IS ‘WATERSHED MOMENT’ FOR MINISTER’S CREDIBILITY – BRYAN

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OUTCOME OF CAP IS 'WATERSHED MOMENT' FOR MINISTER'S CREDIBILITY - BRYAN
23 May 2013

OUTCOME OF CAP IS ‘WATERSHED MOMENT’ FOR MINISTER’S CREDIBILITY – BRYAN

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IFA officers from around the country will lobby TDs and Senators at the Mansion House in Dublin today (Thurs), and will spell out the negative consequences of a CAP deal that includes a minimum payment. John Bryan said IFA remains opposed to this and other measures such as flattening and regionalisation as they would be hugely disruptive to productive agriculture.

Ahead of next week’s Farm Council meeting in Dublin, IFA President John Bryan has reminded the Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney that he had referred to the outcome of the March meeting as a ‘watershed moment’ in terms of the flexibilities secured for Ireland. “Any backtracking on this will be a watershed moment for his credibility. The Minister for Agriculture must stand his ground and insist that the flexibilities agreed at the March meeting, which did not include a minimum payment, are retained in the final deal.”
IFA’s campaign to secure an outcome to CAP Reform that works for Irish agriculture will intensify in the coming days, with a protest planned for Dublin Castle next Tuesday.

John Bryan has called on the Minister Coveney to renew and reinforce alliances with other like-minded Member States in order to bolster opposition to Commissioner Ciolos’s demands in the CAP Reform negotiations.

The IFA President met key figures in Strasbourg yesterday, including Irish MEPs, Joseph Daul, head of the EPP, George Lyon and Paolo de Castro, both of whom are rapporteurs for the Parliament and Jim Nicholson, MEP for Northern Ireland.

Following a meeting with the Spanish Minister for Agriculture Miguel Arian Canete, John Bryan said the Spanish Minister strongly rejected Commissioner Ciolos’s proposal for a mandatory minimum payment as part of the outcome of the CAP Reform negotiations.

“The Spanish Minister was very clear that a minimum payment simply does not work in Spain, for the same reason it does not work for Ireland. It would result in cuts of up to 50% on productive farmers, which would do serious damage to the productive base of Spanish agriculture.”

John Bryan said Spain would be supporting Minister Coveney’s approximation model as the limit of the cuts in payments that could be borne by productive farmers.

The IFA President called on the Minister to strengthen his alliances with other Member States and face down Commissioner Ciolos’s demand for a minimum payment which would make his approximation model totally unworkable for Ireland.

“There must be no back-tracking on the March Council agreement, which did not include any mandatory minimum payment,” John Bryan stressed.

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