MINISTER MUST NOT SELL OUT IRISH FARMING IN CAP REFORM DEAL

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MINISTER MUST NOT SELL OUT IRISH FARMING IN CAP REFORM DEAL
27 May 2013

MINISTER MUST NOT SELL OUT IRISH FARMING IN CAP REFORM DEAL

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Ahead of a protest outside Dublin Castle tomorrow (Tues), IFA President John Bryan warned the Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney that the outcome to CAP Reform must support active, productive farmers. He said any other result would deliver a serious blow to our production base, and would represent political failure by the Minister as it would result in a sell-out of Irish farming.

John Bryan said, “Minister Coveney cannot allow a deal that will have negative consequences for Ireland. A mandatory minimum payment would destroy the Minister’s approximation model and lead to a level of redistribution that would be hugely damaging for Irish agriculture.  IFA remains opposed to this and other measures such as flattening and regionalisation”.
Mr Bryan said IFA’s position on CAP Reform has a strong mandate based on the Association’s democratic structures. “Our policy is based on what active farmers want to see the Minister secure in the final deal. Individuals who have no production do not represent farm families, and have no mandate for, or interest in, supporting active, productive farmers. The Minister cannot be diverted from achieving the right outcome.”

John Bryan reminded the Minister Coveney that he had referred to the outcome of the March meeting as a ‘watershed moment’ in terms of the flexibilities secured for Ireland. “If these flexibilities are lost, then it will be a watershed moment for his credibility. The Minister for Agriculture must stand his ground and insist that the flexibilities agreed at the March meeting, which did not include a minimum payment, are retained in the final deal.”

The IFA President met the Agriculture Commissioner Dacian Ciolos this afternoon and told him bluntly that his reforms do not work for Ireland. He said, “The Commissioner is refusing to accept the decision reached in March by the Farm Council and is intent on pushing through a set of proposals that is deeply flawed and ultimately will be a step back in the development of our agricultural sector. There must be no back-tracking on the March Council agreement, which did not include any mandatory minimum payment,” John Bryan stressed.

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