PHIL HOGAN ON EUROPE’S FORESTS – 25 NOVEMBER

Home
Brussels Daily
PHIL HOGAN ON EUROPE'S FORESTS - 25 NOVEMBER
25 Nov 2015

PHIL HOGAN ON EUROPE’S FORESTS – 25 NOVEMBER

Brussels Daily

Speech at the Breakfast Meeting “Europe’s Forests in the Sustainability Spotlight”, European Parliament (Strasbourg)

We are all aware of the value that European society attributes to

forests. Wooded areas represent one of our most important land

uses, covering about 40% of the EU total area – and have been

expanding steadily.

 

And this has been an important year for forests. The Seventh

Ministerial Conference on the Protection of Forests in Europe

recently took place in Madrid, and the COP21 in Paris will be a

huge global opportunity to highlight the importance of forests.

 

 Crucially, we have also delivered the EU Forest Strategy,

providing guidance, direction and a blueprint for truly joined-up

thinking in relation to this important sector.

 

There is a pressing need to ensure the long term sustainable

Management and development of forests, balancing the

economic, social and environmental benefits they deliver.

 

The new EU Forest Strategy aims to establish the right

framework to achieve this. It seeks to promote the sector’s ability

to create innovation, growth and jobs while ensuring sustainable

forest management. It also addresses many of the issues that will

be discussed here today.

 

(Jobs & Growth)

Forestry is one of the main sectors that keep our rural areas

vibrant and sustainable. Forest-based industries provide nearly

three and a half million jobs in the EU and produce a total added

value of 135 billion euros a year.

 

 The new EU Forest Strategy underlines that a sustainable,

trained and safe workforce is one of the pillars of a more

competitive forest sector. Well-managed forests with qualified

forest managers, workers and entrepreneurs will be vital for a

sustainable and competitive forest sector.

 

(Forestry and Rural Development)

From the CAP point of view, the Rural Development policy

offers significant opportunities for supporting the sustainable

and active use of forests.

 

 In the Rural Development Programmes for 2014-2020, Member

States have the option to include measures on afforestation, the

establishment of agroforestry systems, as well as investments in

forestry technologies.     They have the possibility to invest in

processing and marketing, organisational support for producer

groups, and co-operation in innovation and knowledge transfer.

 

Within the 118 Rural Development Programmes for 2014-2020,

around 7.2 billion euro of public expenditure is programmed for

forestry measures. This includes measures for enhancing the

environmental benefits of forests, such as biodiversity, soil

protection, or measures to prevent flooding and erosion.

 

(Circular Economy & Bioeconomy)

Forestry represents a key sector in the transition towards a low-

carbon and climate friendly economy.

 

Thus, forestry in the EU today faces several challenges and

opportunities. The demand for forest biomass is likely to

continue to increase, in line with the worldwide demand from

traditional industries, as well as from the growth of the

bioeconomy.

 

The increased usage of wood as a sustainable and renewable raw

material can contribute to decarbonise our economy, by

substituting for energy intensive materials. Accordingly, by

reducing our dependence on from external sources, we

contribute to the resilience of the Energy Union.

 

These new opportunities provide job and income opportunities

for forest owners and related sectors.

 

Indeed, beyond traditional uses of biomass, for example pulp

and paper, forestry also contributes to produce new bio-based

products such as biolubricants and biosolvents, as well as

biomaterials such as bioplastics or biopolymers. It also provides

ecosystem services such as soil carbon sequestration.

 

In order to attract investment in new value-chains in the forest

sector, we need to support research and innovation, maximise

human and social capital, and provide a stable and coherent

policy framework.

 

In forestry, we support the bioeconomy in three main ways:

 

As already mentioned, through the EU Forest Strategy, which

puts forests and the forest sector at the heart of the journey

towards a successful bioeconomy;

 

Through research and innovation funding;

 

And through the European Agricultural Fund for Rural

Development and networking activities. As mentioned earlier,

around 7.2 billion euro of public expenditure is programmed for

period 2014-2020 for forestry measures.

 

But we need more investments to make the bioeconomy a

reality, and smart Financial Instruments will be a key tool. I am

working closely with the European Investment Bank to develop

schemes that reflect the present and future needs of our foresters

and related rural businesses.

 

This is also closely related to the circular economy. Next week,

the Commission plans to adopt a new Circular Economy

Package, which will include a Communication on future actions

and initiatives to promote and support the circular economy.

 

 

 

(Bioenergy, Biomass sustainability)

As mentioned in the Communication on the Energy Union, the

Commission will propose a new Renewable Energy Package in

2016-2017. This will include a new bioenergy sustainability

policy as well as legislation to ensure that the 2030 EU

renewable energy target is met in a cost-effective manner.

 

The new bioenergy sustainability policy should encompass the

sustainable management of forests, in line with the EU’s Forest

Strategy.

 

Bioenergy based on forest biomass will continue to remain the

largest source of renewable energy in the EU. Accordingly, the

use of biomass is promoted through the EU renewable energy

policy and its implementation by Member States.

 

 

 

(Land Use & Climate change)

In the framework of the 2030 Energy and Climate Union, there

is a growing relevance of the integration of the land-use, land-

use change and forestry (LULUCF) sector into the 2030 EU

Climate and Energy Framework.

 

Currently, in the EU, the amount of carbon stored annually by

the LULUCF sector represents 9 – 10 % of EU annual GHG

emissions.

 

Work on LULUCF is also addressed in the EU Forest Strategy,

and in the recently adopted Forest Multi-annual Implementation

Plan, which has climate change as one of its priorities.

 

The Commission is currently working on the question of how to

deal with Agriculture and Land Use, Land Use Change and

Forestry (LULUCF) in the future climate policy framework up to

  1. Apolicy proposal will be presented in 2016, based on a solid

impact assessment of the different options and COP21 outcomes.

 

The Impact Assessment will include a quantification of the cost

effective GHG mitigation potential in agriculture and LULUCF. It

will analyse the pros and cons of the possible options for the

integration of LULUCF in the 2030 Climate Framework. It will

also explore combinations of various elements of these options that

would allow the achievement of the target in the most cost-effective

way, ensuring coherence between the EU’s food security and

climate change objectives.

 

 

In conclusion, it is my hope that the 2030 Climate and Energy

framework will act as a catalyst for the future development of the

bioeconomy, which is a major priority for the Juncker Commission.

 

Copyright 2017 © - The Irish Farmers Association - Web Design Dublin by Big Dog